Government Resolutions to regulate Chinese Markets in India

Ayushi Choudhary and Pushpam Raj Pandey, law students, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohiya National Law University

Introduction

With the outbreak of COVID-19, the Indian Government adopted certain protectionist measures to save the Indian industries from predatory capital investments. As seen in the past, the agenda behind amendments in the Foreign Direct Investment Policy (“FDI Policy”) has been to promote the ease of doing business by liberalizing the policies and making India “an investor-friendly nation”. However, amidst these unprecedented times, the Government opted for a bold move and released a press note on April 17, 2020(“Press Note 3”) to amend the consolidated FDI Policy of 2017. This came into effect on April 23, 2020 via a press release with the aim of regulating the opportunistic takeover of the Indian companies from astute business organizations.

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ANTI -ARBITRATION INJUNCTION: JURISDICTION AND DISCRETION

Khushi Mishra & Rajeev Dadhich  , Institute of Law, Nirma University.

Introduction

The approach of the Indian courts in dealing with the anti-arbitration injunction has been disjunctive and imbalanced. On 12th Aug 2020, the Calcutta High court in Balasore Alloys Limited v. Medima LLC attempted to clarify the position of the Indian courts to grant an anti-arbitration injunction in a foreign seated arbitration. It held that the Indian courts have inherent power to grant anti-arbitration injunction, subject to a higher degree of the threshold. Anti-arbitration injunctions are often viewed as a challenge to the arbitral tribunals’ power to determine its own jurisdictions, generally regarded as the Kompetenz- kompetenz principle, which is perceived to be the pillar of the arbitration framework.

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Restructuring and Anti- Takeover Restructuring Measures to Protect MSME Sector: One Step Forward?

Shatakshi Tripathi, Symbiosis Law School, Pune

As India’s GDP contracts by 23.9% in the first fiscal of this financial year, it does not come as a surprise that businesses continue to suffer the collateral damage of the COVID pandemic. With crumbling market conditions, active measures have been adopted by the Governments, across the globe, to pacify the increasing distress in the economy. The Indian Government also adopted various measures to mitigate the impact of the COVID crisis, especially on the Micro, Small and Medium Enterprise (“MSME”). Amongst other fiscal measures, the struggling MSME sector gained its first sigh of relief through the Confederation of Indian Industry’s (“CII”) idea to set-up a COVID Rehabilitation and Relief Fund to provide direct monetary assistance to the MSMEs. Along with this, the CII also recommended various measures, inter alia, an extension of bank loans, a special fund, steps regarding the filing of GST and improving the welfare of workers etc. that were necessary to tide in MSME’s through the pandemic. In this article, the author analyzes the measures adopted to protect the MSME sector, with a special focus on the debt restructuring measures and safeguards against opportunistic takeovers.

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Minority Squeeze Out: Dissecting the Conundrum over Multiple Takeover Routes

Priyanshu Agrawal and Vaishnavi Vyas, NMIMS KPM School of Law, Mumbai

Introduction

In India, squeeze-outs have become an area of increasing interest and scrutiny. The extant legal framework provides for several methods through which squeeze-outs can be effected in Indian companies. On February 03, 2020, a newly notified provision, Section 230(11) of the Companies Act, 2013 (the “Act”) has been introduced to enable minority squeeze-outs in unlisted companies. The new rule enables a majority shareholder holding more than 75% of the stake in a company to make a takeover offer to acquire the minority stake. However, the amendment is a half-baked remedy and provides minimal protection to the minority shareholders. Having said that, the new rules do not envisage any clarity on the existing provisions but merely are an additional tool reflecting hostile takeover in unlisted companies.

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